Archiv für die Kategorie "English"

On Design Tools and Processes - Viljami Salminen

For the past year(s) I’ve been chasing for answers. Looking for new tools, thinking about design processes and figuring out what design really means to me. At times I’ve felt so disconnected with our pro­cesses that I’ve wondered if my career choice was right.
For a field rooted in the fine arts this period of change has been increasingly hard and is about to get even harder. We’ve moved away from designing static pages to creating digital systems of components, but we’ve done that mostly by using the same static design tools like Illustrator, Sketch, or even Figma. Tools

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short status; "link back" set to 'show'…

Accessibility, The Free Market, and Punching Nazis While Sitting Down – Heydon Pickering

By characterizing disability as a discrete ‘target’ group, the aim is to excuse the creation of products and services which do not cater for disability. “Oh I’m not making things for disabled people. But I’m sure someone else is, don’t worry. Such-and-such law of economics states it must be so.”

Disability does not work that way, though. It isn’t a discrete community or field of interest. It is complex, multifaceted and pervades all kinds of cultural identity through race, socio-economic level, gender identity, and faith. If you create an inaccessible product or service, you are almost guaranteed to be

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Going rogue - Jeremy Keith

now we’re into slippery slopes and glass houses. One person might draw the line at creating a Muslim registry. Someone else might draw the line at including any kind of invasive tracking script on a website. Someone else again might decide that the line is crossed by including Google Analytics. It’s moral relativism all the way down. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t draw lines. Of course it’s hard to live in an ideal state of ethical purity—from the clothes we wear to the food we eat to the electricity we use—but a muddy battleground is still capable

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Tooligans

git pull tooligans

Jake Archibald ponders on Twitter about the state of web development

(make sure to read the whole thread)

— it seems that many developers are more obsessed about controlling the onslaught of complexity by creating and maintaining a plethora of tools, for pre- and post-compiling, minifying, deploying, testing, and automating every possible aspect of 'the workflow'.

Being a web developer seems to be more and more about mastering tools, not creating solutions that benefit the users. And how easy it is to get lost in this tool driven jungle, to ...

Where Wizards Stay Up Late - Katie Hafner

(…) In the 1960's, when computers where regarded as mere giant calculators, J.C.R. Licklider at MIT saw them as the ultimate communications devices. With Defense Department funds, he and a band of visionary computer whizzes began work on a nationwide, interlocking network of computers. Taking readers behind the scenes, Where Wizards Stay Up Late captures the hard work, genius, and happy accidents of their daring, stunningly successful venture.
katiehafner.com

Set the Boy Free - Johnny Marr

I wanted to convey a feeling of breaking free, that has been a constant throughout my life. A feeling that expresses itself as both escape and discovery. Transcendence. I found it through rock ‘n’ roll and art and a journey living both in the modern world. (…)
I’m happy to say that the time has come to tell my story.
johnny-marr.com

Resilient Webdesign - Jeremy Keith

Jeremy Keith has published a new book, and anyone who's enjoyed one of his recent talks about the build-in robustness of the core web technologies, and how we managed to cripple it by designing with the wrong focus, might want to read this.
I certainly do, this is very much up my alley.

With a title like Resilient Web Design, you might think that this is a handbook for designing robust websites. This is not a handbook. It’s more like a history book. (…) You won’t find any code in here to

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We've come a long way, baby

Logical map of Arpanet, May 1973 by Paul Newbury

This morning this picture was shared across my Twitter timeline:

It is the logical map of complete 'internet' in 1973, created by Paul Newbury, whose son David (@workergnome) recently shared it on Twitter.

Wow, the Arpanet fitted on one single sheet of paper a few decades ago. :)

Reminds me again how 'new' this webfangled thing still is that since has become such a large part of our lives.

The design, the code, 1909 texts, the illustrations, and some photos are made by me.

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