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Archiv für die Kategorie "English"

IllHIll - Holger Lamers

In my series of "Thank you"s regarding the community around the Beyond Tellerrand Conference, next is Holger.

Not only has he done one of the epic conference shirt motives himself, but has printed several editions of the yearly shirt editions.

Holger has been on nearly every Beyond Tellerrand conference, with his screen-print machine and fine collection of shirts, caps, sweats, you name it, and for years now we always have some chats in the breaks, and usually I find myself with the urge to buy something off his table sooner ...

Web Annotation: The Web’s Conversation Layer - Lyza Danger Gardner @ Beyond Tellerrand Düsseldorf 2018


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The evolution of Web Annotation mirrors that of the Web itself, in miniature, facing off with some of the same big themes of identity, security, authority and freedom.

Next in line in my series of "thank you" posts is Lyza.

This talk -- or more precisely, the talk's topic -- is far away from the stuff I'm usually dealing with. You know, design, front end, code and applications. And yet, this also something I cherish about Beyond Tellerrand conference: To get a glimpse of what lies, well, beyond the Tellerrand, the own horizon and sometimes ...

The Dangers of Being a Web Developer - Jens Oliver Meiert @ Beyond Tellerrand Düsseldorf 2018

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I've been following Jens' output for over a decade now. Not regulary, but every now and then some of his smart observations and thoughts surface in my information stream.
So I was excited to see his name in the speakers list, and his talk about the pros and cons of being a web worker did resonate with me.

So thank you Jens, for reminding me why I am doing this for two decades now. And again, that I am not alone, even though I often feel isolated when working in clients work, feeling like I ...

Eight Years Beyond Tellerrand

This will be a short blog post, because I want to get out some thoughts as quickly as possible, not waiting for that time that never comes in which I sit and craft a well written lengthy text.
Which is why I didn't blog for some years now after I visited Marc Thieles phantastic event, even though I managed to be at least once in a year at one iteration of this very special conference.

So what has changed?

Well, nothing really, it is just that I want to ...

How to Build an Atomic Bomb - Mike Monteiro @ Beyond Tellerrand Düsseldorf 2018

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Wow. It was on the historical date of May 8th, that Mike Monteiro held this intense talk, reminding each and everyone who cared to listen of the conseqences and the possible impacts of the "I'm only doing my job here" mentality.

This talk gave me several goose bumps, having seen "5 came back" only recently, and still seeing this one shot of the inside of a german concentration camp, where right after the allied troops went in, a film team documented not only the unimaginable horror and piles of dead and starving ...

The indieweb privacy challenge (webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPT) - Sebastian Greger

A thorough article on the current challenges, technically and ethically, regarding the use of elsewhere published public data that can be regarded as 'personal data' in the GDPR/DSGVO sense. Data that will be published for example by pulling in likes, shares and comments posted on Twitter here in my blog, as 'reactions' alongside with 'real' comments on my posts.

As Sebastian writes

Just the fact that I can aggregate a “facepile” showcasing everybody who clicked “like” on a tweet of mine does not mean that my motivations for doing so are more important than their right to stay in control

...

The Illusion of Control in Web Design - Aaron Gustafson

Recognizing all of the ways our carefully-crafted experiences can be rendered unusable can be more than a little disheartening. No one likes to spend their time thinking about failure. So don’t. Don’t focus on all of the bad things you can’t control. Focus on what you can control.
Start simply. Code defensively. User-test the heck out of it. Recognize the chaos. Embrace it. And build resilient web experiences that will work no matter what the internet throws at them.alistapart.com

From hexcodes to eyeballs

A great article diving into the maths and physics of colour reception and reproduction.

… an exploration of electromagnetic radiation, optical biology, colorimetry, and display hardware …jamie-wong.com

DWNTLETSIEB* revisited

No, websites do not need to look exactly the same in every browser, but while styling a details/summary element recently, I thought I had found smart way to make the default "open/closed" markers behave visually a bit nicer without resorting to re-invent several wheels and hacking my way with "::before" contents:

.acc-trigger {
list-style-type: none;
}
.acc-trigger .section__heading {
color: #900;
cursor: pointer;
display: inherit;
list-style-type: disclosure-closed;
list-style-position: inside;
}
.acc-item[open] .section__heading {
list-style-type: disclosure-open;
}
.acc-item .content {
margin-left: 1.25em;
}

Problem is: even without looking at another platform, Firefox, Safari and Chrome on my Mac can't find a common ground on how this should be rendered.

Firefox is spot on to my intentions:
A ...