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Archive for "English" (page 2)

Fighting uphill - Eric Bailey

Digital accessibility is a niche practice. That’s not a value judgement, it’s just the way things are. Again, it’s hard to fault someone for creating an inaccessible experience if they simply haven’t learned the concept exists.
And yet, seventy percent of websites are non-compliant. It’s a shocking statistic. What if I told you that seventy percent of all bridges were structurally unsound?
Some engineers who work with physical materials have a reminder of the gravity of the decisions they make. They wear iron rings to remind them that they have an obligation to the public good, and that actual lives ...

Making Future Interfaces: Inline SVG – Heydon Pickering

youtube direct svg

Syndicate some Blogposts from WordPress to Kirby with the REST API - Revisited

One year ago I established a connection between some blog posts here to my portal site via the WordPress REST API, a cron job, and some php-scripts.

This weekend I revisited the code, since there was one detail that kind of bugged me: The REST API treats "categories" as an OR condition; but for my use case I wanted an AND condition. I only want to show posts that have a combination of categories, like "english" AND "webdesign", but the API returns all posts having one of the two categories.

I have updated my portal site to the new Kirby 3 version recently, and that needed little tweaks here and there, and so I had a look at the blog teasers code. After reading the WordPress REST API documentation (again), I think there is no way to get this AND condition I wanted, so I had to refactor the code on the other end.

Danko Jones, Nashville Pussy, Prima Donna US Tour Gigposter

*rrrrrrrrrr…

… rock!!
I really like the new Danko Jones tour poster.

The practical value of semantic HTML – Bruce Lawson

When Sir Bruce speaks up, you'd better listen. That's the law, son.

(…) If the importance of good HTML isn’t well-understood by the newer breed of JavaScript developers, then it’s my job as a DOWF (Dull Old Web Fart) to explain what it means, and why it’s important.
Gather round, Fullstack JavaScript Developers – together we’ll make your apps more usable, and my blood pressure lower.brucelawson .co.uk

No, really, please read this. I might be biased, I might be a DOWF too, but there's a reason that people who have been accompanying "the web" since the early days keep ...

SMEgnorance

(The following is my translation of my blog post "KMUnverstand" which originally was published in German and seemed to resonate with quite a few people in my web dev bubble. It surely is full of grammar- and spelling-errors, but I hope the gist of it will come across anyway)

In our small web-studio we have our problems with advertising "hey, we've launched a new web site, look here, it's awesome!".

Because the launch is only a part of the ongoing process, the real work starts after the launch, even if many think that it is the finish line. But, especially with CMS-driven web sites, it needs some time and work by the editors to see if the ideas for the designed components really work as desired. Plus, even right after the launch one is already smarter than before and has many new ideas how to better solve some details than before. Despite the seemingly average life-span of web projects, our clients work with their sites way longer than five years. With the dynamic changes in the "web technology" field over the last five to ten years, this means that there needs to be constant team-work and a regulary exchange between us and our clients over possibilities and new or changed requirements.

Unfortunately, especially in the SME environment that we often deal with, "websites" are still seen as a fixed product. One "buys" this once, expecting it to work "as is" from that moment on until an internal decision in the distant future. So there is a great deal of ignorance and non-comprehension if ongoing maintenance and service shoud be considered and paid. The feeling of unwanted dependence is strong, especially because often open-source solutions seem to be initially "free". Because web packages for 5-10 EUR a month seem to work fine on first glance. If then a monthly support and maintenance package with at least 20 times the price is offered (a budget allowing for only 1-2 hours a month for work on the site), this totally seems over top and something that can be economized and saved. Why bother, the site works as is, right?

State Of The Word - Matt Mullenweg @WordCamp US, Nashville

youtube direkt link

Is this talk the reason why WordPress 5.0 was released while its main new component, the Gutenberg editor, is regarded as not really production-ready by many?

When a big company like Automattic decides to prioritize a deadline they pluck out of thin air over enabling people with impairments to use the editor that they will be forced to use it is absolutely shocking. Even more shocking is the message that it sends out that accessibility compliance is not as important as flashy new featuressmashingmagazine.com

The figures Matt presents in this talk are impressive, the ...

Warming Stripes - Germany

Annual temperatures in Germany from 1881-2017. The colour scale goes from 6.6°C (dark blue) to 10.3°C (dark red).

This set of visualisations highlight how we have witnessed temperatures change across the globe over the past century or more. The colour of each stripe represents the temperature of a single year, ordered from the earliest available data at each location to now. All other superfluous information is removed so that the changes in temperature are seen simply and undeniably.climate-lab-book.ac.uk

Markup, friends, markup

This morning a tweet by Heydon Pickering landed in my timeline, where he quoted a text that started 10 things to learn for becoming a solid full-stack JavaScript developer, only to include a paragraph As for HTML, there's not much to learn right away and you can kind of learn as you go, but before making your frist templates, know the difference between in-line elements like <span> and how they differ from block ones like <div>.

Heydon aptly commented this with How Full Stack Development is destroying the web: a story in two pictures.(Source)

This triggered me (not his ...