Archiv für die Kategorie "Design"

CSS Grid Support - Safari now haz it, as well

Ja tschakka! Anfang des Monats Firefox, sehr kurz darauf Chrome, dann Opera, jetzt Safari -- es tut sich mächtig was in Sachen CSS-Grid.

Nachtrag: Das Update auf iOS 10.3 hat dem dem dortigen Safari ebenfalls CSS-Grid beigebracht:

Poster Rock – Malleus Rock Art Lab

Gestern hatte ich die Ehre und Gelegenheit, mit unserer Basssport-Gruppe in einer Galerie aufzubassen. Die Untergrund-Galerie in Neu-Isenburg hat eine Ausstellung zu "Icons Of Our Pop Culture", und neben Fotos von diversen Musikern, zu denen ich Affinität verspüre, gab es auch Grafik und Drucke diverser Machart... aber für mich noch interessanter, in einer Ecke waren eine Reihe von Drucken/Plakaten, die eigentlich nicht zur aktuellen Ausstellung gehören. Und da waren einige sehr SEHR schöne Motive von Malleus darunter. Ich bin ja ein großer Freund der Siebdruck-Poster und habe mittlerweile ...

CSS Grid Support - Chrome now haz it, too

Uh baby. Nur einen Tag nachdem Firefox einen in Sachen CSS-Grid Support vorlegte: Chrome konnte das natürlich nicht auf sich sitzen lassen, und so ist heute der CSS-Grid-Support im neuen Chrome 57 gelandet. Grid it while it's hot. :-)

Yescss!

CSS Grid Support - Firefox haz it

Das wohl spannendste derneueheissescheiss Feature für moderne Weblayouts ist gestern einen Schritt näher an die normalen Webnutzer rangerückt: Firefox unterstützt in der nun aktuellen Version 52.0 CSS-Grids! Und Chrome wird das auch noch im März hinter dem "Experimental" Flag hervorholen.

Darauf warte ich schon seit über einem Jahr, denn CSS-Grids machen so viele Problemchen, mit denen die werte (Frontend) Webentwicklung in Zeiten der Cholera Verunsicherung mobilen, also in Zeiten, in denen niemand mehr verlässlich sagen kann, welches Gerät mit welchen Eigenschaften denn nun gerade auf der ...

On Design Tools and Processes - Viljami Salminen

For the past year(s) I’ve been chasing for answers. Looking for new tools, thinking about design processes and figuring out what design really means to me. At times I’ve felt so disconnected with our pro­cesses that I’ve wondered if my career choice was right.
For a field rooted in the fine arts this period of change has been increasingly hard and is about to get even harder. We’ve moved away from designing static pages to creating digital systems of components, but we’ve done that mostly by using the same static design tools like Illustrator, Sketch, or even Figma. Tools

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Resilient Webdesign - Jeremy Keith

Jeremy Keith has published a new book, and anyone who's enjoyed one of his recent talks about the build-in robustness of the core web technologies, and how we managed to cripple it by designing with the wrong focus, might want to read this.
I certainly do, this is very much up my alley.

With a title like Resilient Web Design, you might think that this is a handbook for designing robust websites. This is not a handbook. It’s more like a history book. (…) You won’t find any code in here to

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Atomic Design - Brad Frost

Brad has coined the term 'Atomic design' (although there has been a slight and friendly banter with Andy Clarke about who first mentioned this as an idea how elements of a design can be organized) for his idea for a methodology to create the 'lego' bricks for a (web) design system.

I think the real power in his idea is not that it is new (it is not), but that the analogy to atoms, molecules, organisms, and the assembly into templates/pages very much encompasses the endless variety that such a 'simple' system can produce, which is exactly what designing for ...

Inclusive Design Patterns - Heydon Pickering

I find myself falling down deeper and deeper inside the rabbit hole that my profession as a designer for the web is. The more complex, daunting and exciting the task gets to make something work on an unknown number of devices, for users with a wide range of technical, physical and mental capabilities in an even wider set of context and surroundings, the more I find solace in the core ideas of the 'early web': This is for everyone. From my experience in the last 20 years, we focussed on the wrong side of web 'design'; the adaptation of ...

Writing Less Damned Code - Heydon Pickering @Beyond Tellerrand Conference, Berlin 2016

Vimeo direct slaponthebackofthehead

Concatenating, minifying, compressing, caching: all serviceable ways to improve the performance of web interfaces. But none are as effective as not coding something in the first place. Code that don't exist is infinitely performant and extremely easy to maintain and document. This talk will identify some examples of front-end code that are either not needed at all, make the interface worse just by being there, or can be replaced by something much, much simpler. Say hello to unprogressive non-enhancement.

Less is Less!

The design, the code, 1919 texts, the illustrations, and some photos are made by me.

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